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Training

Friday, 8 November, 2019

#nostirrupnovember: our tips to survive your no-stirrup sessions

Have you ever heard of no-stirrup November? In recent years, November has become the month when many riders take off their stirrups for a good cause. Real moment of fear, even of suffering for some, while for others, it is a pure moment of happiness ... riding without stirrups is a must in the practice of equestrian sports. In this article we share our tips to survive your sessions without stirrups.

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Wednesday, 11 September, 2019

Our advice to get back to work after summer break

Summer is coming to an end, holidays are over, it’s time to get back to work but you don’t know where to start? Seaver will guide you to get your horse back to work after some holidays with efficiency and carefulness!

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Thursday, 27 September, 2018

Understanding Seaver’s "Cadence" and "Elevation" features

Did you know that your Seaver girth or sleeve measured the cadence and elevation of your horse while working? But what do these terms exactly mean?? In this article, we give you the keys to understand these two features and their interests for your horse's daily work ☺ What is the cadence of my ...

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Thursday, 16 August, 2018

How to prepare your horse for the cross-country course? Throwback to the canter training sessions of Raphael Cochet for the Grand Complet

Raphael Cochet and his mare Shérazad were present at the Haras du Pin last weekend for the Grand Complet 2018. Unfortunately no ranking for them but a great clear round cross-country course in 6'44'' where they were able to use their Seaver girth sleeve 🙂 Let’s look back on the canter training sessions made ...

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Thursday, 9 August, 2018

Understanding Seaver’s "symmetry" feature

The Seaver girth and girth sleeve evaluate your horse/pony’s symmetry during training. But what exactly is symmetry? In this article, we explain how it is measured and why it is so important 🙂 What is the symmetry of my horse? Symmetry implies that both forelimbs and both hind limbs are used equivalently. A sound horse ...

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